A complete list of the 56 presidential homes in the U.S. open to the public for guided tours.

Written by

Jason Barnette

on

February 14, 2020

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Ever heard of Mount Vernon, Monticello, and Montpelier? How about Wheatland, Grouseland, or FDR’s Little White House? Some presidential homes are more well-known than others. But when I decided to write a list of all the presidential homes you can visit, I found much more than I ever knew existed.

This is a definitive list, to the best of my knowledge, that includes homes where presidents lived at one point in their life that you can actually visit. I did not include markers where homes used to be, recreations of historic homes, or presidential homes not open to the public. Sure, that means I left a lot of historic sites off this list, but I figured 57 presidential homes was enough for a good list.

The list is organized by state to help you visualize a potential road trip visiting more than one of these sites. How many of these have you already visited? Which would you like to visit next? Leave me a comment below and let me know!

Arkansas

President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site

At this small National Parks site in Hope, Arkansas visitors can explore the two-story home where President Bill Clinton grew up. Begin at the visitor center for a walk through of Clinton’s life in a small museum, then take the guided tour of the birthplace home next door.

President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site 412 Division Street, Hope, AR | 870-777-4455 | https://www.nps.gov/wicl/index.htm

Florida

Harry Truman’s Little White House

Originally built in 1890 as housing for naval officers at the submarine base in Key West, Florida, in 1946 the house was used by a president for the first of many times. President Harry Truman spent 175 days of his presidency at the Little White House from 1946-1952. Visitors can take a guided tour of the home to learn about the history of Key West, conversation of the house into the Little White House, and the other presidents who have visited since.

Harry Truman’s Little White House 11 Front Street, Key West, FL | 305-294-9911 |  https://www.trumanlittlewhitehouse.com/

Georgia

Many of the furnishings at the Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson were provided by the Wilson family.

The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson

In 1860 the First Presbyterian Church of Augusta, Georgia purchased a house for use by the Reverend Joseph Wilson. At the time Thomas Woodrow Wilson was just two years old, and he would spend the next twelve years of his life living in the manse. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house that is remarkably filled with furniture and items owned by the Wilson family.

The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson 419 Seventh Street, Augusta, GA | 706-722-9828 | https://www.wilsonboyhoodhome.org/

READ MORE: 7 Intriguing Places to Discover the History of President Woodrow Wilson

Roosevelt’s Little White House

In 1921 Franklin Delano Roosevelt fell ill on family vacation and was later diagnosed with polio. He was paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life. In 1932, while governor of New York, Roosevelt built a house in Warm Springs, Georgia, in a hope that hydrotherapy could cure his paralysis. FDR visited several times during his 12-year presidency and died at the Little White House in 1945. Today visitors can tour the Little White House, Historic Pools Museum, and several other buildings on site.

Roosevelt’s Little White House State Historic Site 401 Little White House Road, Warm Springs, GA | 706-655-5870 | https://gastateparks.org/LittleWhiteHouse

Illinois

Lincoln Home National Historic Site

In 1839 this 12-room Greek Revival style house was built in downtown Springfield, Illinois and served as Abraham and Mary Lincoln’s home for 17 years. The home was first opened to the public for tours in 1887. Today visitors can take guided tours of the house and learn about the Lincoln family.

Lincoln Home National Historic Site 426 South Seventh Street, Springfield, IL | 217-492-4241 | https://www.nps.gov/liho/index.htm

Ronald Reagan Birthplace Museum

President Ronald Reagan was born in 1911 in an apartment above a bakery in Tampico, Illinois. He only lived there four months before his family moved into a house down the street. Today the second-floor apartment has been restored and the first floor restored as an early 1900s bank. Visitors can take guided tours of the apartment beginning at the gift shop next door.

Ronald Reagan Birthplace Museum 113 Main Street, Tampico, IL | 815-622-8705 | https://www.tampicohistoricalsociety.com/R_Reagan_Birthplace_Museum.html

Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home

Throughout the 1920s the family of President Ronald Reagan lived in this small house in Dixon, Illinois. Visitors today can take guided tours April – October to see the home where Reagan lived as a young boy and learn about his history in the small town.

Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home 810 S. Hennepin Avenue, Dixon, IL | 815-288-5176 | https://reaganhome.org/

U.S. Grant Home State Historic Site

When Ulysses S. Grant moved to Galena, Illinois with his wife they initially rented a small home for $100 a year. Only a few months later Grant returned to military service during the Civil War. At the end of the war he returned to Galena and was presented a new brick Italianate house by the people of the city in appreciation for his achievements. Today visitors can take guided tours of the house where the Grand family lived sporadically between 1860 and 1880.

U.S. Grant Home State Historic Site 500 Bouthillier Street, Gelena, IL | 815-777-3310 | https://www2.illinois.gov/dnrhistoric/experience/sites/northwest/pages/grant-home.aspx

Indiana

Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site

In 1875 the three-story Italianate Victorian style house was built for the Benjamin Harrison family. President Harrison is the only native of Indiana to ever be elected president. Today visitors can start at the welcome center in the reconstructed carriage house and take a tour of all three floors of the restored home.

Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site 1230 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, IN | 317-631-1888 | https://bhpsite.org/

Grouseland

When William Henry Harrison was appointed governor of the Indiana Territory in 1800 he purchased 300 acres along the Wabash River in present-day Vincennes, Indiana, and built a governor’s mansion. Modeled after his Berkeley Plantation home in Virginia, Grouseland was the first brick building in Indiana. Also called the “White House of the West”, Harrison used the home to sign several treaties with Native Americans during his presidency. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the mansion and freely walk the grounds.

Grouseland 3 West Scott Street, Vincennes, IN | 812-882-2096 | http://www.grouselandfoundation.org/

Iowa

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site

In 1874 Herbert Hoover was born in a tiny two-room cottage. Hoover only lived in the cabin for the first three years of life and after leaving he never returned to live there again. But in 1935 Hoover, along with his wife Lou Henry, purchased the old cabin and restored it. Today visitors to the national historic site can visit the location of the Birthplace Cottage while also exploring the Presidential Library and Museum and visiting Hoover’s final resting place.

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site 110 Parkside Drive, West Branch, IA | 319-643-2541 | https://www.nps.gov/heho/index.htm

Kansas

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum & Boyhood Home

The Eisenhower Boyhood Home is the original house where the Eisenhowers lived from 1898 until 1946, in its exact location, and furnished with items from the family, making it one of the most authentic presidential homes in the country to visit. Visitors to the site can also explore the research library, museum, and watch an orientation film at the visitor center.

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum & Boyhood Home 200 SE 4th Street, Abilene, KS | 785-263-6700 | https://www.eisenhowerlibrary.gov/

Kentucky

Knob Creek Farm

The main attraction at this small historic site is a one-room log cabin that was the boyhood home of President Abraham Lincoln. In 1811, when Lincoln was just two years old, the family moved to Knob Creek and remained for five years. Today visitors can take a tour of the historic site.

Knob Creek Farm 7120 Bardstown Road, Hodgenville, KY | 270-358-3137 | www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/sites/knob.htm

Massachusetts

Adams National Historical Park

Two presidents were born on this historic property in Quincy, Massachusetts. The John Adams Birthplace is a two-story log structure built in 1681 and purchased by Adams’ father in 1720; in 1735 John Adams was born in the house. The John Quincy Adams House was built in 1663, ironically making it older than his father’s house, and in 1767 John Quincy Adams was born in the house. Visitors can take guided tours of both homes while also exploring the grounds and attending special events.

Adams National Historical Park 1250 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA | 617-770-1175 | https://www.nps.gov/adam/index.htm

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site

In 1914 Joseph Kennedy purchased a five-year-old house on Beals Street in Brookline, Massachusetts. Three years later John Fitzpatrick Kennedy was born in the upstairs bedroom of that house. The family moved out of the house in 1920 but in 1966 Rose Kennedy, JFK’s mother, purchased the house and restored it to the original 1917 condition. Visitors to the historic house can take a guided tour, learning about the Kennedy family and life in America in the early 1900s.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site 83 Beals Street, Brookline, MA | 617-566-7937 | https://www.nps.gov/jofi/index.htm

Missouri

Harry S. Truman Birthplace State Historic Site

In 1884 Harry S. Truman was born in a small house in Lamar, Missouri. When he was just ten months old the family moved to Harrisonville. In 1957 the birthplace house was sold to the state of Missouri and two years later President Truman himself attended the dedication ceremony of the new state historic site. Visitors to the site can explore the birthplace home and grounds.

Harry S. Truman Birthplace State Historic Site 1009 Truman Street, Lamar, MO | 417-682-2279 | https://mostateparks.com/park/harry-s-truman-birthplace-state-historic-site

Harry S Truman National Historic Site

From 1867-1885 the gorgeous home in Independence, Missouri at the heart of this park was built by George Potterfield Gates. In 1919 President Harry S. Truman married Gates’ granddaughter, Bess Wallace, and the couple made this their permanent home until 1972. Today visitors can take guided tours of the Truman Home and visit many other historic buildings located around the historic site.

Harry S Truman National Historic Site 223 North Main Street, Independence, MO | 816-254-2720 | https://www.nps.gov/hstr/index.htm

Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site

In 1848 Ulysses S. Grant married Julia Dent in St. Louis, Missouri. Grant was still in the U.S. Army so she spent most of her time living at her father’s house at the center of this national historic site. When Grant left the army in 1854 he returned to White Haven, the name of the house, where he lived with his wife and children until 1860 when they moved to Galena, Illinois. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house, learning about the Grant and Dent families and life on the farm.

Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site 7400 Grant Road, St. Louis, MO | 314-842-1867 | https://www.nps.gov/ulsg/index.htm

New Hampshire

Franklin Pierce Homestead Historic Site

In 1804 Franklin Pierce was born in a small log cabin in Hillsborough, New Hampshire. Shortly after birth the family moved into a new house built by Pierce’s father, where Franklin Pierce would live until his marriage in 1834. Today visitors to this historic site can take a guided tour of the homestead and learn about the early life of the 14th president.

Franklin Pierce Homestead Historic Site 301 2nd NH Turnpike, Hillsborough, NH | 603-478-3165 | https://www.nhstateparks.org/visit/historic-sites/franklin-pierce-homestead-historic-site

The Pierce Manse

The three-story frame house called The Pierce Manse was the only home ever owned by President Franklin Pierce, and it was not originally located at its current site in Concord, New Hampshire. When the home was slated for demolition in the 1970s a group of volunteers formed the Pierce Brigade, raised the funds to move the house to a new location, and saved it from destruction. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house that served as the Pierce family home 1842-1848.

The Pierce Manse 14 Horsehoe Pond Lane, Concord, NH | 603-225-4555 | http://www.piercemanse.org/

New Jersey

Grover Cleveland Birthplace State Historic Site

In 1832 the First Presbyterian Church in Caldwell, New Jersey built a home as a “manse”, or home where the church’s pastor would live. From 1834-1841 the Reverend Richard Falley Cleveland lived in this house and in 1837 Grover Cleveland was born. In 1907 a group of Cleveland’s friends purchased the house and six years later opened it has a birthplace museum. Today visitors can tour the house, browse through the gift shop, and learn about the life of President Grover Cleveland.

Grover Cleveland Birthplace State Historic Site 207 Bloomfield Avenue, Caldwell, NJ | 973-226-0001 | https://www.nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/historic/grover_cleveland/gc_home.htm

New York

Martin Van Buren National Historic Site

In 1839, while serving as president of the United States, Martin Van Buren purchased a grand thirty-six room mansion in Kinderhook, New York. In 1841 after he failed to win a second term as president, losing to William Henry Harrison, he moved into the house, which he named Lindenwald, and remained until his death in 1862. Today visitors can take a guided tour of Lindenwald and learn about his presidency and life on the property in the late 1800s.

Martin Van Buren National Historic Site 1013 Old Post Road, Kinderhook, NY | 518-758-9689 | https://www.nps.gov/mava/index.htm

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

In 1866 James Roosevelt purchased an estate with an Italianate style mansion on the property. In 1882 Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born in a bedroom on the second floor. Springwood, as the mansion was named, would remain his home throughout his life. Just before his death Roosevelt donated the house to the federal government and was eventually transferred to the National Park Service. Visitors to Springwood can take a guided tour of the house and visit the gravesite of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site 4097 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park, NY | 845-229-9115 | https://www.nps.gov/hofr/index.htm

READ MORE: The Fascinating Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Millard Fillmore Presidential Site

This small frame house, no longer at its original location, is the only remaining home of President Millard Fillmore. The Aurora Historical Society purchased the house in 1975 and conducted an extensive restoration project to return the house to its 1826 condition. Visitors today can take a guided tour of the house, gardens, and carriage house.

Millard Fillmore Presidential Site 24 Shearer Avenue, East Aurora, NY | 716-652-4735 | https://www.aurorahistoricalsociety.com/pages/millard-fillmore-presidential-site

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site

In 1884 Theodore Roosevelt hired an architect to design and build a grand home on property he had purchased in Oyster Bay, New York. A year later he moved into the only home he would know for the rest of his life, aside from his time living in The White House. During his seven summers as president Roosevelt would visit Sagamore Hill, earning the house the nickname of “Summer White House”. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house and several other buildings on the property.

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site 20 Sagamore Hill Road, Oyster Bay, NY | 516-922-4788 | https://www.nps.gov/sahi/index.htm

U.S. Grant Cottage State Historic Site

Dying of throat cancer and desperate to finish his memoirs to provide financial security for his wife, Ulysses S. Grant moved to a small cabin in Wilton, NY in mid-1885. Six weeks later Grant finished his memoirs and sent them off to his publisher, Mark Twain. Two days later Grant died in the cottage. Today visitors can take a of the cottage which has been furnished and decorated just as it would have been in 1885.

U.S. Grant Cottage State Historic Site 1000 Mt. McGregor Road, Wilton, NY | 518-584-4353 | https://www.grantcottage.org/

North Carolina

Mordecai Historic Park

Mordecai Historic Park in Raleigh, North Carolina is home to many historic structures, but one of particular note is the birthplace home of President Andrew Johnson. The small house was saved from demolition in the late 1800s and moved to the park along with other historic homes. Visitors to the historic park can tour many of the historic structures.

Mordecai Historic Park 1 Mimosa Street, Raleigh, NC | 919-996-4364 | https://www.raleighnc.gov/places/mordecai-historic-park

Ohio

First Ladies National Historic Site

A visit to this national historic site in Canton, Ohio, will give you two incredible treats: it was the home of President William McKinley and Ida Saxton-McKinley, and today it is operated as the First Ladies National Historic Site!

The home was built in two stages in 1841 and 1865. It originaly served as the family home of Ida Saxton, but from 1878-1791 Ida lived at the house with her husband, William, while he served in the U.S. House of Representatives. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house while learning about the history of the home and all the first ladies.

First Ladies National Historic Site 205 Market Avenue South, Canton, OH | 330-452-0876 | https://www.nps.gov/fila/index.htm

Harding Home Presidential Site

The Harding Home was designed by Warren Harding and his fiancée, and future wife, Florence in 1890 in Marion, Ohio. The next year they were married at the house. The Hardings would call this home until 1921 when they left for The White House after winning the election. After Warren Harding died in 1923 and Florence in 1924 the house opened as a museum and has continued since that time. Visitors to the house can take a guided tour and see hundreds of the house after a 2020 restoration to its 1920 appearance.

Harding Home Presidential Site 380 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Marion, OH | 740-387-9630 | http://www.hardinghome.org/

James Garfield National Historic Site

In 1876 James Garfield purchased a large house in Mentor, Ohio for his family. In 1880, while running for president, Garfield would frequently give campaign speeches to large crowds from the covered front porch. Visitors to the national historic site today can stand on that very same covered porch and take a guided tour inside the house.

James Garfield National Historic Site 8095 Mentor Avenue, Mentor, OH | 440-255-8722 | https://www.nps.gov/jaga/index.htm

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library & Museums

In 1856 Richard Birchard purchased 25 acres of wooded property in Fremont, Ohio, with the intent to build a house where he could live with his nephew, future President Rutherford B. Hayes. In 1873 Hayes and his family moved into the two-story brick mansion at Spiegel Grove. In 1880, nearing the end of his presidency, Hayes began a series of expansions to the house that lasted through his death in 1893. Today visitors can take a guided tour through the home with rooms that were recently restored to the last time period used by the Hayes family.

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library & Museums Spiegel Grove, Fremont, OH | 419-332-2081 | https://www.rbhayes.org/

The Ulysses S. Grant Boyhood Home and School

This privately-owned historic site in Georgetown, Ohio includes two significant places to President Ulysses S. Grant: his boyhood home and his first schoolhouse. The home was built in 1823 by Grant’s father and saved from demolition in the early 1980s to open as a house museum. The two-room school was about around 1829. Visitors to the historic site can tour the boyhood home, schoolhouse, and the Tannery across the street where a very young Grant worked for his father.

The Ulysses S. Grant Boyhood Home and School 219 East Grant Avenue, Georgetown, OH | 877-372-8177 | http://usgrantboyhoodhome.org/

U.S. Grant Birthplace

In 1822 Ulysses S. Grant was born in a small frame cottage in Point Pleasant, Ohio. The cottage would only serve as home for a year, though, as Grant’s father earned enough money to build a new brick house and tannery in Georgetown. Today visitors to the historic house can tour inside and enjoy one of many events on the small property.

U.S. Grant Birthplace 1551 State Route 232, Moscow, OH | 513-497-0492 | http://www.usgrantbirthplace.org/

William Howard Taft National Historic Site

This two-story Greek Revival style house in Cincinnati, Ohio was the birthplace and childhood home of President William Howard Taft. His father, Alphonso, moved to Cincinnati in 1838 to open a law practice and bought this house almost ten years later. Visitors to the national historic site can take a guided tour of the home.

William Howard Taft National Historic Site 2038 Auburn Avenue, Cincinnati, OH | 513-684-3262 | https://www.nps.gov/wiho/index.htm

Oregon

Hoover-Minthorn House Museum

This gorgeous home was built in 1881 by Jesse Edwards, the Quaker founder of Newberg, Oregon. In 1885 Dr. Henry Minthorn moved into the house with his family. Learning of a recently orphaned Herbert Hoover, Minthorn offered to foster the future president. Hoover lived in this house for three years. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house museum and learn about the Quaker history of the area and people who lived in the house.

Hoover-Minthorn House Museum 115 S. River Street, Newberg, OR | 503-538-6629 | http://www.hooverminthorn.org

Pennsylvania

The beautiful farmhouse was fully furnished just as President Eisenhower left it.

Eisenhower National Historic Site

In 1950 General Dwight D. Eisenhower purchased almost 700 acres of farmland adjacent to Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania. After becoming president in 1953, Eisenhower and his wife, Mamie, demolished and rebuilt the main home on the property. After completion of the house he would spend a total of 365 days of his presidency on the property and would retire to the home after leaving The White House. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house that has been kept furnished and styled as it would have been in the 1960s.

Tours of this historic site are administered through Gettysburg National Military Park.

Gettysburg National Military Park 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, PA | 717-334-1124 | https://www.nps.gov/gett/index.htm

Independence National Historical Park

The Germantown White House, built in 1752 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, sheltered George Washington twice during his life. In 1793 Washington went to the home to escape the yellow fever epidemic sweeping through Philadelphia, and the very next year he returned to escape a heat wave. Today visitors to the house can take a guided tour to see its original 18th century appearance and learn about the various other people who were once sheltered here.

Independence National Historical Park 526 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA | 215-965-2305 | https://www.nps.gov/inde/index.htm

Wheatland

In 1848 Secretary of State James Buchanan purchased “The Wheatlands”, a 22.5-acre property with a gorgeous mansion in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The very next year he moved his family to Wheatland and, other than the four years he served as president, lived there until his death in 1884. Today visitors to the historic site can take a guided tour of Wheatland, explore the museum, and walk the ground and gardens.

Wheatland 230 North President Avenue, Lancaster, PA | 717-392-4633 | https://www.lancasterhistory.org/visit/

South Carolina

This presidential home was built by President Woodrow Wilson’s parents when they moved to Columbia,

The Woodrow Wilson Family Home

In 1870 the Reverend Joseph Wilson moved his family, along with 14-year-old Thomas Woodrow Wilson, to Columbia, South Carolina. Joseph and his wife Jessie designed and built a two-story Italian Villa style home where they lived for four years. Today the home is maintained by Historic Columbia and used as The Museum of Reconstruction, displaying exhibits and information on the Reconstruction Era after the Civil War. The home is open for guided tours throughout the week.

The Woodrow Wilson Family Home 1616 Blanding Street, Columbia, SC | 803-252-1770 | https://www.historiccolumbia.org/woodrow-wilson-family-home

READ MORE: 7 Intriguing Places to Discover the History of President Woodrow Wilson

Tennessee

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site

The two-story Greek Revival house at this national historic site was built in 1830 in Greeneville, Tennessee. After President Andrew Johnson left office in 1869 he lived at this house with his wife until his death in 1875. Visitors to the historic site are interestingly given a ticket to cast their vote in the impeachment trial of President Johnson. Visitors can take a guided tour of the house, walk the small grounds, and visit his grave at nearby Johnson National Cemetery.

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site 121 Monument Avenue, Greeneville, TN | 423-638-3551 | https://www.nps.gov/anjo/index.htm

The Hermitage

Located in Nashville, Tennessee, The Hermitage is one of the most impressive presidential homes to visit in the country. In 1804 Andrew Jackson purchased 425 acres of farmland. Initial construction on the plantation house began in 1819 and lasted through several phases over the years. Aside from his time serving as president, Jackson lived at The Hermitage until his death in 1845. Today visitors to the sprawling estate can take a guided tour of the mansion, walk through the gardens, and visit many of the other historical structures.

The Hermitage 4580 Rachel’s Lane, Nashville, TN | 615-889-2941 | https://thehermitage.com/

READ MORE: Discover a President’s Boyhood at Andrew Jackson State Park in Lancaster, SC

President James K. Polk Home & Museum

The gorgeous and simple two-story house in Columbia, Tennessee was built by Samuel Polk in 1816 while future President James K. Polk was attending the University of North Carolina. James lived in the house for six years of his life and after that it remained the home for his mother and brother. Today visitors to the only remaining home of President James K. Polk can take a guided tour and see the largest collection of artifacts remaining from his presidency and life.

President James K. Polk Home & Museum 301 W 7th Street, Columbia, TN | 931-388-2354 | http://www.jameskpolk.com/

Texas

Eisenhower Birthplace State Historic Site

In 1890 in a small two-story frame house in Denison, Texas, President Dwight D. Eisenhower was born. Eisenhower would only live there for the first 18 months of life before the family moved to Kansas and he never returned. Today visitors can take a guided tour inside the restored house museum completely refurbished with 1890s-era furnishings.

Eisenhower Birthplace State Historic Site 609 Lamar Avenue, Denison, TX | 903-465-8908 | https://www.thc.texas.gov/historic-sites/eisenhower-birthplace-state-historic-site

The George W. Bush Childhood Home

In 1951 George H.W. Bush spent $9,000 to buy an 11-year-old house in Midland, Texas. For the next four years the house would be home to President George H.W. Bush, his son President George W. Bush, and his other son Florida Governor Jeb Bush. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the childhood home and explore the life of the Bush family in 1950s Texas.

The George W. Bush Childhood Home 1412 West Ohio Avenue, Midland, TX | 432-685-1112 | http://www.bushchildhoodhome.org/

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park

This national historical park has two components surrounding Johnson City, Texas. In Johnson City visitors can take a guided tour of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s childhood home and his grandparents’ log cabin settlement. The second area to explore is the LBJ Ranch, a popular retreat during Johnson’s presidency and his final resting place today.

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park 100 Lady Bird Lane, Johnson City, TX | 830-868-7128 | https://www.nps.gov/lyjo/index.htm

Vermont

President Calvin Coolidge Historic Site

This state historic site in Plymouth Notch, Vermont is probably the coolest presidential home site to explore in the country because it’s not just a house, it’s an entire village! The Wilder House, built in 1830, was the childhood home of President Calvin Coolidge’s mother, Victoria Josephine Moor. In 1876 Colonel John Coolidge purchased a one-and-a-half story farmhouse where Calvin Coolidge would grow up. Visitors can take a guided tour of the homes while also exploring the village green, 1840 church, 1890 schoolhouse, and a pre-1835 general store and post office.

President Calvin Coolidge Historic Site 3780 Route 100A, Plymouth Notch, VT | 802-672-3773 | https://historicsites.vermont.gov/calvin-coolidge

Virginia

Berkeley Plantation

In 1726 this gorgeous Georgian style mansion was built by Benjamin Harrison IV at Berkeley Plantation in Charles City, Virginia. In 1773 William Henry Harrison, the 9th president of the United States, was born at Berkeley Plantation. Then, in 1833, the 23rd president of the United States Benjamin Harrison was born in North Bend, Ohio, and later lived in this same plantation house. Visitors to Berkeley Plantation can take a guided tour of the mansion with guides dressed in period costumes and take self-guided tours of the grounds.

Berkeley Plantation 12602 Harrison Landing Road, Charles City, VA | 804-829-6018 | http://www.berkeleyplantation.com/

Monticello

At the age of 26 Thomas Jefferson inherited land from his father in Charlottesville, Virginia. Jefferson immediately set to design a plantation house he would later name Monticello, one of the most magnificent presidential homes in the country. Visitors to Monticello can take a guided tour of the house, explore exhibits at the museum, and explore the gardens.

Monticello 931 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville, VA | 434-984-9800 | https://www.monticello.org/

Montpelier

In 1764 President James Madison, just a boy at the time, helped his family move into their new home at Montpelier in Orange, Virginia. Built by his father, James Madison, Sr., the house underwent several expansions over the next forty years. When President James Madison left office after his second term in 1817 he retired to Montpelier until his death. Visitors can take a guided tour of the house, walk the miles of trails across the grounds, and explore galleries in the museum.

Montpelier 11350 Constitution Highway, Montpelier Station, VA | 540-672-2728| https://www.montpelier.org/

The view across Bowling Green of the Mansion at Mount Vernon.

Mount Vernon

In 1734 Augustine Washington, the father of President George Washington, built a one-and-a-half story house on the banks of the Potomac River just south of Alexandria, Virginia. When George Washington took over the estate in 1754 he began a series of expansions, eventually finishing 50 years later with a 21-room mansion he called Mount Vernon. Visitors can take a guided tour of the mansion, walk through the gardens and historic areas on the grounds, and visit a recreation of the grist mill and distillery where Washington once made whiskey.

Mount Vernon 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Highway, Mount Vernon, VA | 703-780-2000 https://www.mountvernon.org/

READ MORE: Everything You Need to Know to Visit George Washington’s Mount Vernon in Virginia

Poplar Forest

In 1773 Thomas Jefferson’s wife, Martha, inherited a 4,819 acre plantation in Virginia called Poplar Forest. At first Jefferson managed the plantation from his home in Monticello, but when the British invaded the area in 1781 during the Revolutionary War he was forced to seek shelter at Poplar Forest. The octagonal house was built in 1806 and Jefferson would visit 3-4 times each year as a retreat. Today visitors can take a guided tour of the house and learn about the history of the plantation, Jefferson’s architecture, and things he did while visiting the retreat.

Poplar Forest 1542 Bateman Bridge Road, Forest, VA | 434-525-1806 | https://www.poplarforest.org

Rapidan Camp

Shortly after Herbert Hoover was elected president in 1928 he began a search for a place to build a retreat within one hundred miles of Washington, D.C. He eventually selected a site at the headwater of the Rapidan River inside what would later become Shenandoah National Park. Hoover spent his own money to purchase the land and building materials for the construction of a small camp including The Brown House, a lodge where he would spend quite a bit of time during his presidency. Today visitors to Shenandoah National Park can participate in a 2.5-hour guided ranger trip to Rapidan Camp to explore several of the buildings.

Shenandoah National Park 540-999-3500 | https://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm

Sherwood Forest Plantation

In 1720 one of the longest frame homes in the country was built on a plantation in Charles City, Virginia. In 1842 President John Tyler, still serving in office at the time, purchased the property from his cousin. After leaving office Tyler moved to the property and remained until his death in 1862. Visitors today can take a guided tour of the house, by appointment only, and self-guided tours of the grounds.

Sherwood Forest Plantation 14501 John Tyler Memorial Highway, Charles City, VA | 804-829-5377 | http://www.sherwoodforest.org/

Tuckahoe Plantation

From 1730-1740 the gorgeous plantation home was built by William Randolph and his wife Maria Judith Page in Richmond, Virginia. By 1745 the Randolph’s children were left orphaned when both William and Maria died. Shortly after William’s death his good friend Peter Jefferson arrived to tend to the children, bringing with him his own two-year-old son Thomas Jefferson. Today the home is a popular wedding venue, but visitors can still take guided tours of the house and self-guided tours of the grounds during “open hours”.

Tuckahoe Plantation 12601 River Road, Richmond, VA | 804-774-1614 | http://tuckahoeplantation.com/

The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum

Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born in 1856 in the manse, a term used to describe the residential home owned by the Presbyterian Church for their pastor. The three-story brick house, built in 1846, is maintained today as part of The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum. Visitors can take a guided tour of the birthplace home and explore the museum where they will see Wilson’s 1919 Pierce Limousine on display.

The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum 20 North Coalter Street, Staunton, VA | 540-885-0897 | https://www.woodrowwilson.org

READ MORE: 7 Intriguing Places to Discover the History of President Woodrow Wilson

Washington, D.C.

Lincoln Cottage

For three summers during the Civil War President Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary left The White House to live at this small cottage on a hill in Washington, D.C. While spending time at the cottage Lincoln would contemplate the war and created the framework of the Emancipation Proclamation. Visitors to the cottage can take a guided tour inside the home and learn about the decisions made by the president while there.

Lincoln Cottage 140 Rock Creek Church Road NW, Washington, D.C. | https://www.lincolncottage.org

The President Woodrow Wilson House

This gorgeous three-story Georgian style home was built in 1915 and in 1921, at the end of his second term, President Woodrow Wilson and his wife, Edith, moved here. Woodrow Wilson would only live here until his death in 1924, but Edith remained until her death in 1969. Today The President Woodrow Wilson House offers guided tours daily and several special events throughout the year.

Woodrow Wilson House 2340 S Street NW, Washington, D.C. | 202-387-4062 | https://www.woodrowwilsonhouse.org

READ MORE: 7 Intriguing Places to Discover the History of President Woodrow Wilson

The White House

I couldn’t write a list of presidential homes without mentioning the residence of the current president, even though it’s owned by the people. From 1792-1800 The White House was built in the newly designated Federal district of Washington, D.C. On November 1 of that year John Adams became the first president to occupy The White House. Guided tours are offered, but it takes a bit of effort. Anyone hoping to tour The White House must submit a request through their Member of Congress.

The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. | 202-456-7041 | https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/tours-events/

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7 Responses

    1. You’ve been to FORTY-SIX of these homes? Good grief that’s awesome! Thank you for being such an amazing fan of my travel writing!

    1. After reading your comment I thought about it, a lot, but decided not to add the governor’s mansions to this list. I mostly decided not to do it because it would have added an additional 15 items to this already massive list. But I also wanted to keep this list to private homes with one exception: the White House.

    1. The Lincoln boyhood home in Indiana no longer exists. The Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial is nothing more than a marker. At the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park in Kentucky there is only a symbolic recreation of the cabin he was born in. I only included actual homes in this list; no recreations or memorial markers.

  1. Hi Jason, a great list, thanks. Just informing that the Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace is actually a reproduction. There was only 7 years between the original building being torn down and the reproduction (the shortest time span between an original and a reproduction), so it’s likely to be a faithful reproduction due to recent records at the time the reproduction was built, but still a reproduction nevertheless. (See the book by Louis Picone “Where the Presidents Were Born”.) Cheers, Michael

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