Exploring the Astonishing Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, NC

Explore Fort Macon, change at the bathhouse and go for a swim, or enjoy a day relaxing at this North Carolina state park on the Crystal Coast.

Written by

Jason Barnette

on

January 30, 2018

Each time I step into Fort Macon State Park I ask myself, “How can this park be free?” The astonishing fort is one of the best renovated Civil War-era forts in the country and a treasure along the Crystal Coast of North Carolina. That must be why I keep going back again and again.

A room without windows deep inside Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
One of the interior casemate rooms inside the fort.

Fort Macon State Park

Fort Macon State Park is located at the western end of Bogue Sound, a barrier island in North Carolina, in the small town of Atlantic Beach. The four-lane road through much of the town narrows as it enters the park and becomes Fort Macon Road.

The park does not have an admission fee, making it a rare pleasure for locals and tourists alike. The park is open during daylight hours throughout much of the year so it’s a great day trip destination.

A museum exhibit depicting what life was like at the Surgeon's Office inside Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
The fantastic musuem inside the Coastal Education Center shows what life was like inside the fort.

Coastal Education Center

The exploration begins at the Coastal Education Center. The enormous visitor center has restrooms, an information desk, museum store, and exhibit room. I took a comfortable seat in the auditorium to watch a short video about the history of the park. Once finished I collected my North Carolina State Parks Passport stamp, picked up a map of the fort, and I was on my way to the adventure.

Arched brick doorways, one after another, connecting the rear section of rooms inside Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
The rear doorways connecting all the rooms inside the fort.
Arched brick doorways, one after another, connecting the rear section of rooms inside Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
The rear doorways connecting all the rooms inside the fort.

Fort Macon

Any visit to the fort begins at the wooden footbridge crossing a dry moat into the sally port. There were a couple of benches just inside the entrance, a place to take a break or wait for a demonstration to begin.

The outer wall wraps around the moat and has placements for several canons, though I can’t recall any ever being placed out here. Visitors can walk along the wall, explore the rooms inside the casemate, and take stairs down to the floor of the moat. I always leave this exploration for an access port on the far end of the fort.

Inside the fort there are dozens of rooms within the casemate to explore. Some of the rooms have been set up as exhibit spaces, demonstrating life in the barracks, officer’s quarters, and the quartermaster’s office. Other rooms have nothing more than a wooden floor with a doorway at the rear connecting each of the rooms.

My absolute favorite thing to do at this fort is walk from room to room using the rear doorways. In the very corner of the fort is a room completely shut off from the interior of the fort. I think this must have been some sort of powder storage room because it is very secure.

A brick staircase leads down into an underground room along the outer wall at Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
View from the outside wall surrounding the fort.

Outside Fort Macon

At the far end of the fort is another sally port, or entrance, to the fort. A wooden bridge crosses to a stone staircase built into the outer wall. This is where I always climb to the top of the outer wall and walk around the entire fort.

A staircase in the corner leads down to one of the rooms buried deep beneath the ground. This is where gun powder and ammunition was stored to make sure it could never be ignited by enemy canon fire. It’s also a really dark, really cool place to explore.

A large canon overlooking the distant Atlantic Ocean from the top of Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
The canon on top of the fort overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

Top of Fort Macon

Back inside the fort there are three staircases leading to the top of the fort. The last time I visited only one of those staircases was open, but it still allowed me to walk along the top of the fort. I found several canons on display here along with gorgeous views of the local beach and Atlantic Ocean.

It’s always about this time, standing on top of the fort, overlooking the interior parade ground on one side, the moat on the other, with the ocean nearby, that I realize just how astonishing this fort is. It’s one of the best renovated forts I’ve ever come across and easily on par with national monuments under the National Park Service. Kudos, North Carolina State Parks, you have created one of my favorite state parks in the country.

A fishing boat travels across the deep blue Atlantic Ocean at Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
A fishing boat passes through the inlet near the beach at Fort Macon State Park.

Fort Macon Beach

There is so much more than just the astonishing fort at this state park to explore. Fort Macon Beach is located along Fort Macon Road near the entrance to the state park. There is a huge parking lot which comes in handy for all the people hoping for a free beach access in Atlantic Beach.

The Fort Macon Bathhouse is one of the best at any public beach in North Carolina. The restrooms are rather nice, there is plenty of room for changing clothes, and the covered deck is a great place just in case that summer thunderstorm sneaks up on you real fast.

If you’re just looking for a place to hop out of the car and go for a swim, the main parking lot near the visitor center has several beach access points. The access almost directly across from the Coastal Education Center leads to a wooden boardwalk and covered observation deck overlooking the beach and inlet.

A single canon pointed direclty at the entrance of the brick Fort Pulaski National Monument in Georgia
A canon sits near the entrance at Fort Pulaski National Monument in Georgia.

Third System of Seacoast Defense

Fort Macon was built as part of the Third System of Seacoast Fortifications along both the east and west coasts. Some of the other notable forts that are still open for exploration today include Fort Pulaski National Monument in Georgia, Fort Monroe National Monument in Virginia, and Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park in Florida.

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